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Shower Strategies

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According to QuenchShowers.com, a whopping 20-30 liters of water is used in showers. That’s not per shower however, that’s actually water usage per minute. AllianceforWaterEfficiency.org states that showers account for 18% of the total indoor water use in a typical single family home. Given the significant water amount showers consume everyday, it might be wise to be prepared before stepping into the stall.

Showers are already a wise choice over long baths when it comes to physical hygiene and grooming. They take a shorter time to complete and consume less water than baths if done properly. However, even in the cozy shower stall there can still be room for improvement. Check out these shower strategies for more efficient water use in the stall:

Keep it under 5 minutes

 If showers take any longer than that, the water used is about the same as with a full bath. Save solo rehearsals of long-winded ballads and declamations for the bath. A timer may be installed nearby to remind you to speed it up. Another good idea is to install a waterproof CD or mp3 player to play a song while you’re using the shower. Since modern songs last for an average of 3 minutes, it’s good training. If you need more time, choose a longer song roughly 5 minutes long. This can be particularly effective if you’re training the kids to keep their showers short on rush school day mornings.

Install a Low Flow Showerhead

Soap will be washed off by the same amount of water whether you’re using low or high water flow. To minimize excess water usage, test your shower if it has a high flow of water. Hold a 2 quart pan under the shower head and turn it on. If the pan fills with water in twelve seconds or less, consider replacing it with a low flow one. If you have access and control over how much water goes through your water pipes, you can turn the flow down.

Use Low Flow Aerator Showerheads 

These clever devices mix air bubbles into the water flow and make a person feel they’re getting just as much water as with a regular shower. Low flow aerating fittings can cut water use in the shower up to 50%.

Do it the Navy Way 

 The “Navy Shower” is a superb shower strategy that was originally practiced by crew members on naval ships. Since water supply is limited, they have to significantly shorten water usage in showers to conserve supply. Water was turned on for thirty seconds to get wet. It was then turned off as soap and lather were used. Finally, everything is rinsed off in under a minute, as economically and efficiently as possible. Water flow from the shower usually is on only for a minute or half or so, at most just shy of two minutes.

If you’re up to extending water conservation strategies outside the shower room, consider collecting the gray water from the shower and using it to flush the toilet. With simple strategies like these, showers can be a daily act of green living.

 

Photo Credit: Some rights reserved by SeveStJude on Flickr.

Estel M.
About Estel M. (348 Posts)

Estel Grace Masangkay is a creative writer who enjoys outdoor trips and nature activities. She is passionate about sustainability and environment conservation. Follow Me @Em23me.


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